Boone Smith

Have you ever wondered what wildlife is in your backyard or on your property? You and your family can monitor wildlife with remote trail cameras and directly participate in citizen science by providing us with the data to aid in wildlife research efforts!

What is a remote camera? It is a camera that records images when triggered by motion, either as a still photograph or a video - It is a rugged and weatherproof device designed for extended and unmanned use outdoors. For scientists, it is a camera placed by a researcher or photographer to conduct non-invasive research and collect data that shows an animal’s behavior when humans are not present. View our Remote Camera Galleries for exciting examples!

These cameras most often contain a light or heat motion sensor to trigger the camera to take a picture or video when something moves in front of the sensor on the camera. Remote cameras obtain footage that would likely not be possible with human presence.

Pricing and Options
Remote cameras range from $70 to $700 per unit. Additional accessories include: SD memory card ($10-$50 each), ultimate lithium or NiMH rechargeable batteries, security enclosure (metal box to prevent theft), and a padlock and security cable. Depending on your security needs, you may not need all of these.

We Recommend the Following Models:
$70 to $150 Range: Moultrie M-80 or M-100, Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam Night Vision Trail Camera (2011 Model Year)
$150 to $300 Range: Bushnell 8MP Trophy Cam HD Max Black LED Trail Camera with Night Vision (2012 Model), Scoutguard SG550
$500 to $700 Range: Reconyx PC800, PC850, or PC900, Reconyx HC500, HC550, HC600

Note on choosing your camera: As with anything, you get what you pay for. The most important specifications to focus on are the following: Photo quality, trigger speed, and battery life. We highly recommend either the Bushnell Trophy Cam models or the Reconyx models. We would highly discourage purchasing the 'cheaper cameras' (For example: Wildgame innovations, Cuddeback). While they do 'function', they typically have a slower trigger speed (time it takes for the camera to take a photo or video after being triggered), lower photo quality, and shorter battery life. From the recommended models, below is a list of pros and cons for each camera:

Scoutguard SG550
Fast trigger speed (0.5 seconds), good photo quality, average battery life; Downside - Only takes up to a 2 GB memory card (newer cameras accept up to 16 GB or 32 GB SD cards)
Reconyx Models - Very fast trigger speed (0.2 seconds), great photo quality, very good battery life (up to 1 year on a set of lithium batteries), no video capability (but utilizes rapidfire technology)
Moultrie M-80 or M-100
Very slow trigger speed (1.6 seconds), good photo quality, average battery life
Bushnell Trophy Cam 2011 Models
Average trigger speed (about 1 second), good photo quality, good battery life
Bushnell Trophy Cam 2012 Models
Fast trigger speed (0.6 seconds), good photo quality, good battery life

We are more than happy to work with you to help you purchase the camera and accessories you need from the best possible sources. Just let us know how we can be of assistance.



How to Set-Up Your Camera


Email info@felidaefund.org and Felidae Staff will help you set-up your camera.


When your camera station is set-up, you can contact us at info@felidaefund.org. We will give you the instructions and provide you with the data sheets to record your data as a citizen scientist for wildlife research.


  Prev